Monday, December 26, 2011

WILHELM SASNAL

Wilhelm Sasnal (born in 1972) is a Polish painter. Sasnal received his diploma of painting in 1999 from theAcademy of Fine Arts in Krak√≥wSasnal is primarily a painter, but more recently turned to photography and film. Sasnal subjects are more or less banal everyday objects, portraits of historical figures, views of his home town Cracow, snapshots of friends and family members and very often existing images from the internet or mass media are his starting point. His approach is unpredictable and his methods range from graphic reduction and a pointedly two-dimensional, illustration-oriented style to seemingly autonomous gestures with brush and paint.












Monday, November 21, 2011

CONTEMPORARY WATERCOLOR



































Graham Dean




Marlene Dumas

Gerhard Richter

Peter Doig

Gottfried Salzmann, Paris: Pigalle la Nuite II, 1997

Christian Schoeler

Karen Kilimnick (Kilimnick works in water soluble oils)

Elizabeth Peyton

Annie Kevans


Cherry Hood




Friday, October 21, 2011

PETER DOIG

'Painting becomes interesting, when it becomes timeless.'


'The building took me by surprise as a piece of architecture, but it was not until I saw the photographs I had taken of the building through the trees that it became interesting. That made me go back and look at it again. I was surprised by the way the building transformed itself from a piece of architecture into a feeling. It was all emotion suddenly.'









"A picture Doig had made in 1990 of a white canoe mirrored on a lake at night, sold at Sotheby's for £5.7m. It was the most ever paid for a painting by a living European artist. Doig didn't get the money - the painting had been owned by Charles Saatchi - but in that extravagant moment, he went from being a quiet critical success to an infamous commercial one. He was, suddenly, new evidence of the art world gone mad. How did that feel?
'It made me wonder: what am I doing this for?' The way he works didn't help. He cheerfully describes his finished work as the product of 'mistake, after mistake, after mistake', a painstaking process of failing better, and talks of wanting the layered surfaces of his work to be 'slightly repellent, on close inspection'." Read the whole article here: http://outsidetheivorytower.blogspot.com/2008/02/doig-tells-tim-adams-about-lsd-fame-and.html






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